Antique print after Fragonard

EARLY 1900’s AQUATINT,  WITH A MOST EXQUISITE PAINTERLY QUALITY, SIGNED ARTHUR L. COX, after FRAGONARD’S 18th CENTURY FRENCH GENRE PAINTING, THE SWING.

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Product Description

This exquisite signed aquatint, measuring 15.5″H by 12.5″W, was engraved by one of England’s most important turn-of-the-century engravers and is after Jean-Honore Fragonard’s painting Les hazards heureux de l’escarpolette,  The Happy Hazzards of the Swing, affectionately referred to as The Swing.  Our print, presented in its contemporary frame with a silk matte measures 23 3/8″ H by 19 3/4″W.

Fragonard’s original painting is dated 1767, and is owned by the Wallace Collection museum, of London.
See our Links page to tour the wonderful paintings collection on the Wallace Museum website.

THE STORY BEHIND FRAGONARD’S  THE SWING:

From Andrea Fisher’s Lecture-Presentation: Exquisite French Period Art and Interiors- A Journey Through Time.

IN 1767 Jean-Honore Fragonard was commissioned to paint a lascivious scene, depicting a romantic tryst. A courtier initially offered this commission to the great French historical painter Gabriel-Francois Doyen.  However, when Doyen learned of the subject for this commission, he was appalled. He was asked to paint a young woman on a swing being pushed by a Bishop, while the courtier himself was painted hiding in the bushes where he would secretly be peering up the young woman’s dress. Doyen refused this commission and recommended Fragonard; already known as an expert on such subjects. This of course was no problem for the master of amorous scenes and the result was nothing less than a masterpiece. Les hazards heureux de l’escarpolette  is considered the exemplar of 18th century French Rococo and is now part of the permanent collection at the Wallace Museum in London.

Notice the cupid on the left side of the picture.  Fragonard paints the charming 18th century French marble sculpture by Etienne-Maurice Falconet, titled L’Amour Menacant, (Menacing Love).  This mischievous cupid was interestingly enough made for Madame de Pompadour (Mistress to the King), in 1757, after she saw the original which was cast in plaster and exhibited at the Salon. Falconet made a few versions of L’Amour Menacant, two of these were made for Madame de Pompadour, one for her home and the other for her garden.  Falconet’s  L’Amour Menacant can be viewed at the Louvre, the Rijksmuseum and The Hermitage.

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Andrea Fisher Design

Andrea Fisher Design